The Art of Conversion: Closing the Deal With Your Copy

Working as a copywriter, by definition, makes you a salesman. Regardless of the type of piece you’re writing—be it typical advertisements, advertorials, or business website copies—you are selling something in the end. Whether the purpose of your written material might be to directly offer a product or a service, or to introduce an idea that would grab the interest of the reader as part of a bigger marketing campaign, the bottom-line is you need to persuade them to go to the next step upon reading your closing statement.

Your conclusion is vital because that’s what generates leads. It contains the line that ultimately converts your casual reader into a potential customer. Great closing statements make money, thus rendering the entire copy a success.

All the efforts you’ve exerted to produce a high-quality piece will go to waste if the end part is poorly executed. After you’ve properly stated the selling points in the body, the last paragraph or line is where the sales transaction takes place; you simply can’t screw it up by finishing the material in such a weak fashion. If your closing statement is lame and forgettable, your copy might as well have not existed.

To turn you into a wunderkind when it comes to sealing marketing deals by way of writing copies, here are four proven, effective strategies:

Use Call To Action

A “call to action”, or CTA, statement is a common and classic technique used by all copywriters. Simply put, it’s a command prompting the reader to act. The key here is to not leave your audience hanging at the end of the piece. You MUST clearly tell them what to do next.

Look at what Facebook did here:

Facebook Ad

In this ad, the leading social networking site is inviting readers to create an account. The green “Sign Up” button is a quintessential example of a perfect CTA statement: simple, direct, and clear.

Some copywriters compose the CTA in a sentence form, like Are you interested to sign up now? But it’s not as effective as a direct command. Use a verb to start your CTA, and observe brevity to make reading less stressful.

 

Add Some Sense of Urgency

Driving a sale is like gravity; sometimes, all it needs is a little push. Often, customers are almost convinced with the copy, but are still quite hesitant to hand over their money. To even make your CTA more powerful and tell your audience when to take action, adding the word “now” or “today” could actually do the trick.

This is an award-winning ad by Cebu Pacific:

Cebu Pacific Ad

Imagine the ad without “now”. Would it still be as effective? The local airline could’ve said It’s true! You can fly to BALI with our low fare! But by adding a sense of urgency (and cleverly at that) as part of your call to action statement brings the element of time into the equation.

This advertisement made the audience realized the thing they can do “now”, which was to fly from Manila to Bali for only Php888. This created an impression that the fare used to be higher, and those who will make the most of of the offer will enjoy the savings.
Do you see “now” how adding one word to the CTA makes a world of difference?

Other than telling your audience to contact you immediately, you can also provide them an absolute reason not to wait any longer to take action using limited quantity or limited time specials.

Notice that the ad notes the sale period: Up to Nov. 23, 2012 or until the seats last. Creating a fear that they may run out of slot encourages the readers to book a reservation sooner than later. Genius.

Make It Compelling

Remember the immortal line from The Godfather? “Make him an offer he can’t refuse.” Such a strong statement that every marketing professional should keep in mind whenever writing a copy.

But how are you going to do this? One thing: identify a selling point and incorporate it in the CTA. Determine the things that matter to your audience; it could be money, time, energy, or privacy. Your copy should revolve around at least to one of these.
Examine this joint online ad by a satellite TV service provider and an airline company in America:

southwest Ad

Sign up for Dish is clearly the CTA statement, and their copywriter could’ve placed the period after that. But, no. He made it even sweeter and added and get a free Hopper upgrade & 12,500 Rapid Reward Points. On top of the regular services new customers can enjoy from Dish to record their favorite programs whenever they fly, they are now more compelled to join the bandwagon because of the freebies that they can get.

As a matter of fact, they mentioned the word “free” three times—each highlighting a particular perk—to make sure the ad is as attention-grabbing as possible.

 

Include a Guarantee

Another time-tested copywriting gem is leveraging on warranties. A guarantee is always good press because it renders the purchase seem less risky. Customers would feel more confident buying an item or paying for a service with coverage for over a certain period of time.

This home foundation repair company knows how to use the guarantee they offer to their advantage:

guarantee

The company wittingly underscored the great features of the warranty they offer: coverage on all repairs and good for the lifespan of the house. The name of the guarantee itself—Lifetime Transferrable Warranty—stresses that it can be given to the future owners of the property. If you’re the homeowner, and considers reselling the house later on, this warranty helps you gain leverage in the negotiation process by having the liberty to tag the property with a higher price.

All foundation repair providers in the area probably offer the same service, but since the benefits of the guarantee was properly emphasized, this copy made this particular company stand out from the rest without a doubt.

Writing copies with a mediocre closing statement is a crime against marketing. Use these strategies the next time you write your piece, and keep the sales coming!

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Rom-Jaye Amon

Rom-Jaye Amon

Rom-Jaye used to work for Greenwich and Dish before starting his writing career. He is a maverick and a free thinker. He believes in the significance of the written word and loves being surrounded by smarter people. He is half-hearted about everything aside from making literature the center of his universe. He hopes to finish his ghost novel and start creating a real one.
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